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Magic Number

Oct 15, 2013 10:57:32 AM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: The number of times a mom empties her breasts each day to maintain long-term milk production has been called her "Magic Number." If a mom is not nursing enough times in a 24-hour period to meet her Magic Number, her body will eventually down-regulate milk production and her supply will decrease. For working mothers, more breastfeeding at night means more nursing sessions in a 24-hour period, which in turn could mean less pumping sessions needed while mom is at work. For help on figuring out your magic number, click here ttp://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/2010/8/13/the-magic-number-and-long-term-milk-production-part-1.html

Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Breasfeeding and Dental Visits

Oct 8, 2013 2:03:02 PM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: Mothers often delay a dental visit because they're concerned that if they receive local anesthesia, the medication will be passed onto their breastmilk. However, most medications used for oral and IV sedation are considered compatible with breastfeeding. Therefore, there is no need to interrupt breastfeeding after receiving novocaine or other local anesthesias, such as bupivacaine and lidocaine. In addition, Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) sedation is also compatible with breastfeeding because it is insoluble in the bloodstream. That is, once administered, it goes from your brain to your lungs, to the room air, immediately after you stop ingesting it.

Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Increasing Milk Production

Oct 1, 2013 1:44:44 PM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: Massaging the breasts and gently shaking them prior to a pumping session can help you increase pumping output since both aid in moving breastmilk towards the front of the breasts. Another effective way to increase output is to use manual expression after your pumping flow stops. Your hands tend to do a better job than the pump at extracting the breastmilk that comes at the end of a pumping session since the hand motion involved during manual expression is more similar to a baby's suck. In the end, all three methods (massaging, gently shaking and hand expressing) promote better milk removal, which in turn leads to increased milk production.

Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Lipase and Breast Milk

Sep 24, 2013 1:00:19 PM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: Some mothers may notice their expressed milk will have a “soapy” appearance and a taste/smell that becomes sour-smelling rather quickly after being stored. This results from an excess of the enzyme lipase in their milk and only affects a small percentage of mothers. Lipase is responsible for breaking down the fat in breastmilk. If there is an excess of Lipase, then the fat gets broken down too quickly after being expressed, and results in the soapy appearance and sour smell described above. The milk is not harmful and most babies are not bothered by the mild change. However, the longer the milk sits in room temperature, the more apparent the taste/smell becomes to the baby, which of course, may result in more aversion. For more information, check out this helpful link: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/milkstorage/lipase-expressedmilk

Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Breastfeeding Period

Sep 17, 2013 11:41:19 AM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: The return of your period does not mean the end of breastfeeding. During menstruation, breastmilk does not "go bad" or become less nutritious. Some women do notice a temporary drop in milk supply in the days prior to a period and for a few days into one, due to hormonal fluctuations. However, once menstruation begins and hormone levels return to normal, milk supply will boost back up again. Most babies can compensate well for this temporary drop in supply with more frequent nursing.

Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Latch in Older Babies

Sep 10, 2013 1:42:40 PM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: As a baby gets older, it's normal for his latch to not be as wide as the early months. The reason for this is that as his mouth grows, he can can fit more breast tissue into his mouth without needing to open wide. Older babies can actually look like they're nipple feeding, when in fact they are covering enough of the areola to make breastfeeding comfortable for the mother. > http://yummymummystore.com/blog/ > Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)Read More »

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Slow Flow Nipples

Sep 3, 2013 11:08:02 AM

Boob Scoop: When a baby breastfeeds, she can comfort suck after a feeding to help herself settle. However, with a bottle she may appear to still be hungry when all she really needs is more sucking time. A slow flow bottle nipple helps with this because it offers the baby an opportunity for additional sucking time and a chance for the baby to realize that she is full. A slow flow bottle can be particularly helpful when a baby is in daycare: a mom may begin to doubt her milk supply if her baby is drinking more than the she is pumping at work. But it may not be that the baby needs more breastmilk in the bottle but rather that she needs more sucking time. Besides using a slow flow bottle nipple, a pacifier or other soothing methods, like being carried in a sling or carrier, can help a baby to settle after a feeding. http://yummymummystore.com/blog/ Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)Read More »

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Returning to Work

Aug 27, 2013 10:20:23 AM

Boob Scoop: A great way to minimize the worry that comes with the thought of pumping and returning to work, is to do a practice run of what a work day will look like. A week or two before returning, pick a day when someone can watch your baby and schedule pumping sessions as if you were back at work. And of course it's okay if you never get a chance to do this: more important than squeezing in a practice run is to establish good milk supply during the weeks of maternity leave. Establishing good milk supply in the first 8 -12 weeks will play a key role in making the transition to work easier. http://yummymummystore.com/blog/ Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)Read More »

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Bloomberg BusinessWeek
By Patricia Clark
2013 August 26

Since January, the Affordable Care Act has required insurers to cover breast pumps at no cost to new moms. That makes sense, given the law’s focus on preventive medicine. A 2010 article in the journal Pediatrics estimated that if 90 percent of U.S. moms were to breast-feed their infants exclusively for the first six months, it would save $13 billion a year in health-care costs.

The new law might seem like a bonanza for the breast pump trade, pumping millions to manufacturers and retailers. But it requires insurers only to cover pumps—high-end models cost $400 or more—purchased through durable medical equipment suppliers (DMEs). Those are companies eligible to be reimbursed by government and private insurance for certain kinds of medical equipment, usually for long-term use at home. The accreditation process is complex; the market is big: Retail spending for durable medical equipment was $38.9 billion (PDF) in 2011, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Before the law took effect, most DMEs didn’t offer breast pumps, and most stores that sold pumps weren’t accredited as DMEs, says Amanda Cole, who launched the Yummy Mummy on Manhattan’s Upper East Side in 2009 to cater to nursing moms. After she learned about the provision, Cole applied for accreditation as a DME and started courting insurers. “I thought my business was in jeopardy,” she says. “Who’s going to buy a pump when they can get it for free?”

Since the beginning of this year, when the breast pump benefit kicked in, Cole has increased her head count to 17 workers and rented space for a call center, so she could sell nationwide. The strategy is working: Cole, whose company became a DME last year, says she’s selling hundreds of breast pumps a week. “A lot of the DMEs are focused on the elderly and the sick,” she says. “They sell things like oxygen tanks and hospital beds. All we do is breast pumps, and that’s been a great proposition.”

The implementation of the benefit hasn’t been without hitches. Joy Kosak already had a breastfeeding business—she’s the cofounder of a Sacramento (Calif.)-based company called Simple Wishes, which sells hands-free pumping bras—when the new benefit took effect. She launched a new business called Pumping Essentials in November with two employees, waded through the red tape required to open a DME, and teamed up with her first insurer in April. She now has seven workers and says she’s selling about 300 breast pumps a month.

“The language is so vague that it’s being interpreted many different ways by providers,” Kosak says. That means some insurers will only pay for rental or manual pumps. Others have said that it takes weeks to fill out required paperwork, and some insurers have told women that pumps are not covered at all, according to a policy paper published last month by the U.S. Breastfeeding Committee.

Supply has also been a problem. Medela, a major supplier of breast pumps to U.S. hospitals, has increased production of its consumer models by 50 percent to meet demand. That isn’t enough to stop Kosak from worrying about future shortages. Currently, she says, she pre-orders five months worth of inventory to reduce the risk of running out of stock.

Part of the problem is that many DMEs didn’t offer breast pumps until this year, which means they lack historical data to forecast demand, says Rachel Mennell, a spokeswoman for Medela: “After the first year, I think everyone will be able to do a better job forecasting.”

Originally published at http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-08-26/obamacare-encourages-baby-boutiques-to-bet-on-breast-pumps

Posted to In the News by Soledad Toboso

More than nutrition

Aug 20, 2013 12:33:28 PM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: Mothers are often surprised when their growing baby is feeding just as much as they did in the early months. It's important to remember that breastfeeding is more than just a means to acquire food. As your growing baby becomes more aware of his surroundings and is exposed to new experiences, breastfeeding remains a familiar activity, and therefore a comforting one. The numerous experiences of being close to his mother - hearing her voice, smelling her unique scent, receiving the comfort of her warm milk and the biologically specific components of human milk - all work in unison to create the ideal environment for the development and healthy growth of a baby. It's no wonder that breastfeeding is often referred to as a total package mothering tool. http://yummymummystore.com/blog/ Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)Read More »

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

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