Blog

Combing Milk From Pumping Sessions

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Breastmilk from two separate days can certainly be combined. The only recommendation is that you cool freshly expressed breastmilk before mixing it with a batch from the refrigerator.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Prolactin and Volume

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: If you happen to listen to your baby feeding during the wee hours of the morning, you may notice that she gulps more during this time then when compared to the rest of the day. The reason for this is that Prolactin, the milk making hormone, increases at night and, in turn, boosts milk volume. Feeding when Prolactin levels are high also helps moms maintain milk supply steady for a longer period of time.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Number of Times vs Length of Time

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Although it may be tempting to extend a pumping session to produce more milk, it is more important to focus on the number of times you pump instead of the duration of the pumping session. Since milk production is primarily dependent on demand, the number of pumping sessions plays a greater role in milk production and supply than the length of each pump. (The recommended amount of time for a pumping session is 10-15 minutes, however some moms may stop before 10 minutes if they have drained their breasts before then). This tip is especially helpful for mothers who pump at work or who choose to exclusively pump, since a key to maintaining milk production is making sure the breasts are drained enough times during a 24-hour period.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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The Weaning Process

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Weaning from breastfeeding should be approached as a process rather than a one-day event. One important reason for doing it slowly, which is not discussed often enough, are the feelings of sadness and anxiety that can accompany weaning. Part of the reason why some mothers experience these feelings is because weaning creates a shift in hormones. In particular, Oxytocin, which is known as the "love hormone" partly because it induces feelings of relaxation, takes a downturn when weaning occurs abruptly. Viewing weaning as a process is also helpful for the baby/toddler since breastfeeding not only represents a food source but a way to connect with mom. For more info on weaning: http://kellymom.com/ages/weaning/considering-weaning/how_weaning_happens/

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Evening Supply Dip

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Even when breastfeeding is going well, the evening hours can make a mother question her milk supply. The primary reason is that in the evening mothers produce less milk than in the earlier part of the day. Although this dip is normal, it causes babies to cluster feed or feed more often, which can then lead a mother to doubt her supply. But generally a mom need not worry - cluster feeding is attributed to milk supply patterns and normal infant behavior rather than poor supply.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Fast Feeding

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: After the first month of breastfeeding, your baby may begin feeding quicker than she used to, which may lead you to think that she didn't feed enough. However, with an average of about three-hundred feedings in one month, it's likely that she has reached pro status and has just become a very efficient nurser. So if you have a newborn, try to enjoy the days when a feeding can allow for enough time to read through your Facebook newsfeed. These days will pass quicker than you can fathom right now.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Colostrum and Baby Belly Size!

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: In the early days of breastfeeding, mothers often think they are not making enough breast milk due to colostrum being small in quantity and their baby's frequent feeding pattern. However, a woman's body knows to produce a small amount of colostrum to match the newborn belly, which is about the size of a marble. Colostrum is low in volume (measurable in teaspoons, rather than ounces) but packed with protein, carbohydrates and immune system factors. Frequent feeds help colostrum transition into mature milk in order to match the baby's growing belly. Therefore, if a baby is feeding well, wetting and pooping, in the early days of life, frequent feeds should be viewed more as the normal course of breastfeeding rather than a milk supply issue

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Increase your supply?

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: When looking to increase your supply, pump 30-60 minutes after a feed. This informs your body that another feeding is occurring and therefore communicates to your body that more breastmilk is needed. If your baby decides to feed shortly after you've pumped, remember that your breasts are never fully empty. Although the milk flow may be slower, he will still find milk.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Your Stash

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Storing breastmilk in your freezer for an emergency can put your mind at ease and come in handy on a day when you miss a pumping session at work. However, pulling from the emergency stash on a consistent basis can have an adverse effect on milk supply since it may mean that you are pumping fewer times and making up for the milk your baby needs by pulling from the emergency stash. Maintaining milk supply is dependent on how many times you drain your breasts in 24 hours. So if your body receives fewer signals for milk removal it will naturally cut down production so that you don't feel uncomfortable.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Enough Milk

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Moms returning to work often worry about not having enough milk saved in their freezer. The good news is that you only need to have enough for your first day or two back at work. Therefore, two weeks before returning to work, pump one time each day after a morning feeding, when milk supply is the highest, and place your pumped milk in your freezer. On average, breastfeed babies drink one ounce per hour, so calculate the amount you will need for day one based on the number of hours you will be away from your baby. Pumping two weeks in advance is likely to result in enough breast milk but if you rather have some extra, begin pumping sooner. Finally, once you're back at work, not only will you be pumping for the breast milk your baby will drink the next day, but pumping will also keep your production steady.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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