Combining Milk

Apr 11, 2017 11:56:46 AM

Boob Scoop: Breastmilk from two separate days can certainly be combined. The only recommendation is that you cool freshly expressed breastmilk before mixing it with a batch from the refrigerator.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

The Milk Making Hormone

Apr 4, 2017 3:03:41 PM

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

The Weaning Process

Mar 28, 2017 11:05:05 AM

Boob Scoop: Weaning from breastfeeding should be approached as a process rather than a one-day event. One important reason for doing it slowly,which is not discussed often enough, are the feelings of sadness and anxiety that can accompany weaning. Part of the reason why some mothers experience these feelings is because weaning creates a shift in hormones. In particular, Oxytocin, which is known as the "love hormone" partly because it induces feelings of relaxation, takes a downturn when weaning occurs abruptly.Viewing weaning as a process is also helpful for the baby/toddler sincebreastfeeding not only represents a food source but a way to connect with mom.For more info on weaning:http://kellymom.com/ages/weaning/considering-weaning/how_weaning_happens/

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

Number vs. Duration

Mar 21, 2017 11:58:02 AM

Boob Scoop: Although it may be tempting to extend a pumping session to produce more milk, it is more important to focus on the number of times you pump instead of the duration of the pumping session. Since milk production is primarily dependent on demand, the number of pumping sessions plays a greater role in milk production and supply than the length of each pump. (The recommended amount of time for a pumping session is 10-15 minutes, however some moms may stop before 10 minutes if they have drained their breasts before then). This tip is especially helpful for mothers who pump at work or who choose to exclusively pump, since a key to maintaining milk production is making sure the breasts are drained enough times during a 24-hour period.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

Evening Supply

Mar 14, 2017 9:14:19 AM

Boob Scoop: Even when breastfeeding is going well, the evening hours can make a mother question her milk supply. The primary reason is that in the evening mothers produce less milk than in the earlier part of the day. Although this dip is normal, it causes babies to cluster feed or feed more often, which can then lead a mother to doubt her supply. But generally a mom need not worry - cluster feeding is attributed to milk supply patterns and normal infant behavior rather than poor supply.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

Feeding on Demand

Mar 7, 2017 3:09:29 PM

Boob Scoop: The advice of feeding a baby on demand can be challenging when you are tired and feeding frequently throughout the day. However, feeding on demand helps to maintain good milk supply and signals a mother's body to produce the right amount of milk for her baby. Although the phrase "feeding on demand" is generally applied to breastfeeding babies, it's actually how we continue to eat throughout our lives. That is, we eat when our body signals hunger not when the clock strikes a certain time.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

Pumping and Bottle Feeding

Feb 28, 2017 11:28:47 AM

Boob Scoop: When a baby is getting a bottle of expressed breastmilk, it is encouraged that his mother pump at that same time to match her baby's demand. Oftentimes, the expressed breastmilk offered in the bottle is greater than the amount a baby would be receiving if he nursed. This increase in volume from the bottle can cause the baby to skip a feeding. A skipped feeding sends the body a message that the baby is feeding less which in turn may cause a mother's milk supply to dip.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

How Often Does My Baby Breastfeed?

Feb 21, 2017 10:52:37 AM

Boob Scoop: One of the toughest questions for a breastfeeding mother to answer is: How often does my baby breastfeed? It's a tricky question because breastfeed babies tend not to feed on fixed intervals or schedules, primarily because a baby does not receive the same amount of milk at each nursing session. Rather, she drinks just what she needs at each feed. In addition, the composition and volume of breastmilk changes throughout the day, so for one feeding a baby may drink 2 oz while for another she'll drink 4 oz, feeling equally satiated with each feed. More importantly, these breastmilk properties help babies self-regulate their feedings. That is, they feed until they feel content and slow down or de-latch from the breast once they are done. Learning to self-regulate by breastfeeding has been linked to a decrease in obesity in infancy and later on in life.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

Building Your Stash

Feb 14, 2017 10:33:47 AM

Boob Scoop: Once your milk supply has leveled off, around week eight, you may find it difficult to pump extra breastmilk to build a freezer stash. This does not mean that you have a milk supply issue, but rather that your body has adjusted to produce the amount of milk that your baby needs. As you reach the point of producing just the right amount of milk for your baby, your breasts may not feel as full as in the early weeks. This too is normal. If breastfeeding has been going well and your baby is gaining steadily and her diaper output is good, your milk supply is also likely to be on point.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman

Hind Milk and Fatty Milk

Feb 7, 2017 12:43:22 PM

Boob Scoop: Mothers will sometimes encourage their baby to feed longer at the breast to assure greater intake of hind milk, which is the fatty milk that comes at the end of a feeding. However, research indicates that there is no reason to worry about foremilk (which comes at the beginning) and hindmilk. If a baby breastfeeds effectively and feedings are not cut short, he will receive about the same amount of milk fat over the course of a day, despite the breastfeeding pattern. Therefore, there's no need to time feedings. Good milk transfer and steady growth are better indicators that a baby is getting just what he needs.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Comments | Posted in Boob Scoop By Mary Ausman