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Diaper Changes & Feeding

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Mothers often ask if it's better to change their baby's diaper before breastfeeding or after, in order to assure that their baby feels comfortable during a feeding. My best suggestion is that like nursing, it's best to follow your baby's cues since some babies may be happier nursing first, to quench their thirst or hunger, while others won't nurse well until their diaper is changed. However, if you sense your baby is hungry you may want to nurse first since by the time the diaper change is over, he may have reached the point of being too upset to latch on well.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Prolactin and Morning Feeding

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: If you happen to listen to your baby breastfeed during the wee hours of the morning, you may notice that she gulps more than during daytime feedings. The reason for this is that Prolactin, the milk making hormone, goes up at night and in turn increases milk volume. Feeding when Prolactin levels are high also helps to maintain milk supply for a longer period of time.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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CDC Pump Cleaning Guidelines

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Minimize the time you allocate for pumping at work by having extra flanges and bottles so that you don't have to head to a sink after each pumping session. Check out the updated CDC guidelines for cleaning pump parts here: https://www.cdc.gov/…/pdf/hygiene/breast-pump-fact-sheet.pdf

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Mommy as Pacifier?

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Many moms worry about their baby using the breast as a pacifier. While a pacifier is a good option, some babies refuse it or prefer the breast. Not only is this not a bad thing, it is perfectly normal and great way to comfort your baby. Sucking is a big part of a baby’s development and so they will find a way to fulfill that need, whether it’s at the breast, with a pacifier or by sucking their thumb. Using the breast as a pacifier also has some added perks including: helping to delay the return of your period, never needing sterilization and helping to maintain milk production. In the end, what works for you and your baby is the way to go.


Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Introducing Solids & Maintaining Supply

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: When introducing solid foods close to or after the 6 month mark, as is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, it's suggested to breastfeed first then offer the solid food. Approaching the introduction of solid foods in this manner will help maintain a mother's milk supply and reinforce the catchy nutritional statement that solids before age one are mainly for fun.


Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Minimize Pumping Time at Work

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Minimize the time you allocate for pumping at work by having extra flanges and bottles so that you don't have to head to a sink after each pumping session. Also, since breastmilk lasts up to 6 hrs at room temperature, you can use the same flanges and bottles for two consecutive pumping sessions. So, if you pump at 9am and again at 12pm, only 3 hrs will have passed which meets the 6 hr room temperature recommendation. At the end of your work day, bring everything home and wash all your pump accessories.


Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Engorgement and Latching

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Between 3 -7 days post birth, some mothers experience engorgement, which causes the breasts to become very full and warm to touch. The full breasts also cause the baby not to latch on well. So breastfeeding that started with no pain can become painful simply because of the engorgement. In such a case, try pumping or manually expressing for a few minutes to relieve the pressure and to get the baby to latch on better. Oftentimes, 1 or 2 sessions of pumping or manual expression is just what's needed to reduce the fullness and lead to better breastfeeding for both mom and baby.


Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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How Often Do I Feed My Baby?

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: One of the biggest questions breastfeeding moms have is “how often should I feed my baby?” It’s a tricky question to answer because breastfed babies tend to not feed at fixed intervals or schedules, primarily because a baby does not receive the same amount of milk at each nursing session. Rather, she drinks just what she needs at each feeding. In addition, the composition and volume of breast milk changes throughout the day, so for one feeding a baby may drink 4oz while for another she’ll drink 2oz, yet feed equally satiated. More importantly, these breast milk properties help babies self-regulate their feedings. They feed until they feel content and slow down or delatch once they are done. Interestingly, learning to self-regulate by breastfeeding has been linked to a decrease in obesity in infancy and later on in life.


Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Breastfeeding and Night Waking

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Kathy Dettwyler, a leading anthropologist who studies breastfeeding and night-waking from a historical, cross-cultural, and biological point of view, has found that human children are designed to nurse very frequently for their first few years. In fact, it is normal for children to nurse at night up to 3 or 4 years of age. However, since it may not be doable or realistic for some if not most mothers to feed at night for 3 to 4 years, it is helpful to know that there are gentle ways to go about night weaning. For some helpful tips, check out Night Weaning: KellyMom and read a mom's sweet and encouraging experience when it came to weaning her 2-year-old son. http://kellymom.com/ages/weaning/considering-weaning/nightweaning_jack/.


Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Easing Fullness

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: If your baby has started to sleep for longer stretches but your breasts are feeling too full to allow you to get much sleep, manual expression or using a manual pump can help ease the fullness. Manually expressing or using a manual pump can be a lot easier than setting up an electric pump during the wee hours of the morning. If you decide to keep the expressed breastmilk in your room, just remember that it can stay out in room temperature for up to six hours.


Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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