Blog

Latch and the older baby

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: As a baby gets older, it's normal for his latch to not be as wide as the early months. The reason for this is that as his mouth grows, he can fit more breast tissue into his mouth without needing to open wide. Older babies can actually look like they're nipple feeding, when in fact they are covering enough of the areola to make breastfeeding comfortable for the mother.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Breastfeeding and Your Period

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: The return of your period does not mean the end of breastfeeding. During menstruation, breastmilk does not "go bad" or become less nutritious. Some women do notice a temporary drop in milk supply in the days prior to a period and for a few days into one, due to hormonal fluctuations. However, once menstruation begins and hormone levels return to normal, milk supply will boost back up again. Most babies can compensate well for this temporary drop in supply with more frequent nursing.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Shhhh….. Don’t Wake The New Mommy!

Comments  |   Posted in Mummy Scoop   |  By Olivia Leon

Shhhh….. Don’t Wake The New Mommy!

Contributed by Carly Snyder, M.D., a specialist in comprehensive reproductive psychiatry and women’s mental health services.

Newborns are natural night Owls. Infants often sleep throughout the day, but wake up like clockwork every three hours to eat all night long. This schedule puts new moms in a predictably difficult position. Add in recuperating from delivery, hormonal changes and the incredible emotional rollercoaster every new mom experiences and you have a recipe for an incredibly exhausted, often overwhelmed and potentially unhappy new mom.

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Pumping & Work

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: A great way to minimize the worry that comes with the thought of pumping and returning to work, is to do a practice run of what a work day will look like. A week or two before returning, pick a day when someone can watch your baby and schedule pumping sessions as if you were back at work. And of course it's okay if you never get a chance to do this: more important than squeezing in a practice run is to establish good milk supply during the weeks of maternity leave. Establishing good milk supply in the first 8 -12 weeks will play a key role in making the transition to work easier.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Pumping & Oversupply

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Mothers are often advised to pump after feedings in order to establish good milk supply. Although this may make sense for some, (because stimulation usually means more supply), pumping after every feed can actually can create an oversupply of breastmilk in many moms. An oversupply can make it very difficult for a baby to nurse (overflowing milk and breasts so engorged that nipples can flatten) and cause the mother to feel engorged and uncomfortable. Pumping after feedings may be advisable for some mothers but certainly not for all. It is always best to consult a Board Certified Lactation Consultant for concerns regarding milk supply.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Demystifying Midwives

Comments  |   Posted in Mummy Scoop   |  By Olivia Leon

Demystifying Midwives

Contributed by Risa Klein, CNM, OB/GYN NP, M.S.

You’re newly pregnant and it’s time to find the right health care provider to take care of you and your gestating baby. Or perhaps this is your second or third pregnancy and you feel it’s time for a new provider. You’ve heard about midwives and want to know more about what they do, and any benefits that you could experience if you hire one. Here’s the scoop on working with a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) or Certified Midwife (CM). 

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Scarf

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: With the Fall and the season of light pretty scarfs approaching in much of the country, nursing in public can be made much easier. Although you are allowed to breastfeed wherever you have the right to be, some moms feel more comfortable providing some cover to the top of their breast. This is when a light scarf, draped around your neck, can come in handy to provide some cover while allowing you to show off your style ;)

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Cleansing & Nursing

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: When showering, plain water is sufficient to keep the nipple and areola clean. During lactation, natural oils are secreted from the tiny glands on the areola which prevent bacteria from breeding. Soaps can mask or remove the natural oils, which the infant uses as a way to locate the breast. In addition, rubbing some expressed milk on the nipple and air-drying after nursing is also beneficial thanks to breastmilk's anti-infective properties.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Oral Development & Breastfeeding

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Pediatricians advise parents to wean their baby off the bottle by the end of the first year, in part, because long-term bottle drinking can damage a baby's teeth. The one-year recommendation is not applicable to breastfeeding. In fact, among many other benefits, a longer duration of breastfeeding is linked to better oral development. During breastfeeding the unique motion performed by the tongue and jaw help to ensure that the palate develops in a rounded U-shape, which allows for proper teeth alignment. Having a U-shaped palette also decreases the likelihood of snoring and sleep apnea later on in life.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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Double Pumping

Comments  |   Posted in Boob Scoop   |  By Mary Ausman

Boob Scoop: Although it may seem more manageable to pump one breast at a time, double pumping tends to yield more milk since a mother's Prolactin levels are highest when both breasts are stimulated. Another way to boost your Prolactic level? Nurse your baby on one side while you pump the other breast. This tip is especially helpful for moms whose babies feed from one breast per feeding. The breastmilk accumulated from the pumped side can be saved to build an emergency stash in your freezer.

Sharen Medrano, IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)

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