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Milk Volume

Jan 20, 2015 11:45:09 AM

Boob Scoop
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Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Pumping after a Feeding

Jan 13, 2015 10:41:56 AM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: When looking to increase your supply, pump 30-60 minutes after a feed. This informs your body that another feeding is occurring and therefore communicates to your body that more breastmilk is needed. If your baby decides to feed shortly after you've pumped, remember that your breasts are never fully empty. Although the milk flow may be slower, he will still find milk. Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com) http://yummymummystore.com/blog

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Nursing and Exercise

Jan 6, 2015 11:38:54 AM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: Breastfeeding doesn't have to keep you from getting back into your exercise routine. Nursing and exercise can actually work hand-in-hand to keep you healthy and energized enough to care for your baby. Here are responses to the common questions related to exercise and breastfeeding. http://kellymom.com/bf/can-i-breastfeed/lifestyle/mom-exercise/ Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com) http://yummymummystore.com/blog

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Storing Breast Milk

Dec 30, 2014 8:27:13 AM

Boob Scoop
Boob Scoop: Storing breastmilk in your freezer for an emergency can put your mind at ease and come in handy on a day when you miss a pumping session at work. However, pulling from the emergency stash on a consistent basis can have an adverse effect on milk supply since it may mean that you are pumping less times and making up for the milk your baby needs by pulling from the emergency stash. Maintaining milk supply is dependent on how many times you drain your breasts in 24 hours. So if your body receives less signals for milk removal it will naturally cut down production so that you don't feel uncomfortable.Read More »
Posted to Boob Scoop by Olivia Leon

Increasing Milk Supply

Dec 23, 2014 9:35:08 AM

Boob Scoop
When looking to increase your supply, pump 30-60 minutes after a feed. This informs your body that another feeding is occurring and therefore communicates to your body that more breastmilk is needed. If your baby decides to feed shortly after you've pumped, remember that your breasts are never fully empty. Although the milk flow may be slower, he will still find milk.Read More »
Posted to Boob Scoop by Olivia Leon

Pumping & Storing

Dec 16, 2014 10:36:02 AM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: Moms returning to work often worry about not having enough milk saved in their freezer. The good news is that the only day you need to plan for, some days in advance, is your first day back at work. Therefore, two weeks before returning, pump one time each day after a morning feeding, when milk supply is the highest, and place your pumped milk in your freezer. On average, breastfeed babies drink one ounce per hour, so calculate the amount you will need for day one based on the number of hours you will be away from your baby. Pumping two weeks in advance is likely to result in enough breast milk but if you rather have some extra, begin pumping sooner. Finally, once you're back at work, not only will you be pumping for the breast milk your baby will drink the next day, but pumping will also keep your production steady. Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com) http://yummymummystore.com/blog

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Breastfeeding and Weight Gain

Dec 9, 2014 12:13:58 PM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: If your breastfed baby is not gaining as quickly as the early months, it is very likely that she is still growing beautifully. Between six and 12 months, breastfed babies tend to gain two to four ounces a week, which is a drop from the five to eight ounces gained in the first few months. Also, remember that a linear growth pattern is always more important than a baby's percentile on a growth chart. Therefore, a baby on the 10th percentile can be as healthy as one on the 90th.Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com) http://yummymummystore.com/blog

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Cold Season

Dec 2, 2014 12:31:05 PM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: 'Tis the season for colds. However, you don't need to stop breastfeeding when sick. It's especially important to continue nursing since your body creates and passes antibodies into your milk in order to fight the infection you or your baby are experiencing. Oftentimes, a breastfed baby will be the only member of the family who doesn't get sick or the one to get a milder version of the bug. Breastfeeding also allows you to get the needed rest to recover since you can feed while in bed. A win-win scenario! Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com) http://yummymummystore.com/blog

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Shorter, Frequent Pumping Sessions

Nov 25, 2014 10:41:38 AM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: When it comes to pumping, the number of sessions is more important than the duration of the session. Therefore, if you can only spare 30 minutes of your workday for pumping, dividing that time into 3 pumping sessions does a better job at maintaining your milk supply than one session of 30 minutes. The more frequent stimulation, informs your body that your baby is feeding 3 times instead of 1 and therefore keeps milk production steady by meeting one of the golden rules of breastfeeding --Milk supply is driven by demand. Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com) http://yummymummystore.com/blog

Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

Colostrum Quantity

Nov 25, 2014 9:30:43 AM

Boob Scoop

Boob Scoop: In the early days of breastfeeding, mothers often think they are not making enough breastmilk due to colostrum being small in quantity and their baby's frequent feeding pattern. Interestingly, a woman's body knows to produce a small amount of colostrum to match the newborn belly, which is about the size of a marble. Colostrum is low in volume (measurable in teaspoons, rather than ounces) but packed with protein, carbohydrates and immune system factors. Frequent feeds help colostrum transition into mature milk in order to match the baby's growing belly. Therefore, if a baby is feeding well, wetting and popping, in the early days of life, frequent feeds should be viewed more as the normal course of breastfeeding rather than a milk supply issue.

Sharen Medrano, Yummy Mummy Support Group IBCLC (www.nycbreastfeeding.com)
Posted to Boob Scoop by Mary Ausman

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